Divre Harav – February, 2021

Why should Congregation Ahavas Israel and Temple Emanuel share a building?

Imagine that 150 years ago or 50 years ago, we had formed an intentionally combined community that supported both traditional and liberal Jewish practice. Imagine that we had offered multiple streams of programming, learning, and prayer, holidays and life cycle celebrations, for two communities side by side, hand in hand. If we had done this years ago, what would we look like today? 

Rather than feeling like two tiny communities separated by a distance of a couple of miles, we would feel like one small community magnifying and sanctifying each other. Rather than trying to overcome the aversion of feeling like a stranger in each other’s building, we would see full participation in programs like our joint scholar in residence, no matter who was hosting the service or leading the Shabbat table ritual. We would see fewer people reluctant to participate in the other congregation’s programs out of a fear of feeling foolish or ignorant of their practices and customs.

We didn’t accomplish this 50 years ago, but we have the chance to do it now, profoundly changing the future of our community. We are in a better place now than we were back then to accomplish this.

When I arrived in Grand Rapids 27 years ago, the Jewish Federation of Grand Rapids was still known as the Jewish Community Fund. It became a Federation shortly after I arrived, reflecting the fact that it had evolved from a fundraising organization for Israel into a fundraising and programming organization for the good of the Grand Rapids Jewish community as well as Jews around the world. The Jewish Theater and the Shir Shalom Chorus were both relatively new. These organizations, along with the Jewish Cultural Council, brought people together regardless of religious affiliation. The synagogue and temple took a step towards this vision of a shared campus when we combined our religious school programs more than 15 years ago, creating the United Jewish School. Representatives from the synagogue, the school, and the temple are currently working together to hire a Cantor/Educator to oversee with the music program at the temple, provide some cantorial support at the synagogue, and to be the Director of the UJS. We have a track record of successful partnerships across the community that reassures us that we can share a building and support each other’s differences with respect.

Sharing a building wisely means that we can lower our ongoing building and maintenance expenses, freeing up resources for more and better programming. The collaboration committee has recommended moving towards a shared campus on Fulton Street at the current location of Temple Emanuel. We are at a critical stage right now where we have to decide whether we as a synagogue community are prepared to keep moving forward. I can tell you that I trust the integrity of the lay leadership of Temple and the Federation and I trust Rabbi Schadick, and I am excited with the prospect of designing a new space in a shared building. Before this can happen, the synagogue board and the synagogue membership will have more opportunities to cast their vote on whether to move the project forward. There have been several opportunities for the synagogue board and membership to ask question, and there will be more opportunities in the coming weeks and months. I will do my best to answer your questions about the project, or you may contact Sandy Freed or any other member of the Collaboration Committee (the following synagogue members are on the committee: Judy Joseph, Barb Wepman, Diane Rayor, Lanny Thodey, Marni Vyn, Rick Stevens, and Marisa Reed). I hope you will join me in embracing this vision of the future of Grand Rapids Jewry.

Hebrew Words of the Month:

  • Kahal, Kehilah – Congregation, community
  • Merkaz K’hilati – Community Center
  • Amuta – Association
  • Hevra – Fellowship
  • Matna”s – An abbreviation for Mercaz tarbut, noar, u’sport, Center for Culture, Youth, and Sports

2 thoughts on “Divre Harav – February, 2021

  1. Hi David, I read with interest (per usual) your article. Our community made such a move over a year ago. With the byline of “one community, two traditions”…we closed the synagogue and moved to the temple. We renovated the chapel space and brought over out beautiful Aron HaKodesh. One difference for us was our rabbi was retiring and the temple was not renewing their rabbi’s contract. So we now have a new rabbi who is trying to negotiate both traditions.

    Wishing you and your community much ko’ach as you negotiate this journey!

    L’shalom, Pam

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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    • Thank you, Pam. The difference in our case is significant. Both congregations are keeping their rabbis. The proposal is not a merger of congregations, but a consolidation of buildings. One rabbi negotiating two traditions is a challenge. We think that two congregations sharing space and non-clergy staff is a stronger model which will allow us to put more money into programming.

      Like

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